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New Mexico Governor Vetoes Minimum-Wage Increases

April 16, 2017 
By Steven Wishnia and Neal Tepel

Santa Fe, NM - Gov. Susana Martinez vetoed two bills that would have raised the state’s minimum wage for the first time since 2009 on Apr. 6, saying they would hurt small businesses.

One, originally from the state House, would have increased the minimum from $7.50 per hour to $9.25, but would have also prohibited local governments from requiring employers to give workers advance notice of their schedules. The other, from the Senate, would have raised the minimum to $9, with a 60-day “training wage” of $8. “Governor Martinez seems to disagree that anyone working a full-time job should be able to afford to put food on the table and clothes on their children’s back,” said Sen. Clemente Sanchez (D-Grants), the bill’s sponsor. “It’s unfortunate that with the stroke of a pen she can keep $3,000 a year out of the pockets of some of the hardest-working New Mexicans, who have not seen a raise in over seven years.” Martinez said earlier this year that she would have accepted a lower increase, to between $8 and $9 per hour. She used a similar line in 2013, when she vetoed a bill that would have increased the minimum to $8.50. Read more

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