Municipal Government, New York

NYS Preventing Zika Virus from Spreading

August 14, 2016 
By Stephanie West

Albany, NY – The New York State Department of Health, in partnership with the MTA, is deploying larvicide tablets to standing water within the subway system to decrease the prevalence of potential breeding grounds for the albopictus mosquito.

In addition, the Department of Health will coordinate with all state agencies to ensure all measures possible are being taken to proactively address the situation. More than 267 traps are monitored throughout New York State and 110,000 mosquitoes have been tested this year – all showing negative results for the virus.

“The Zika virus remains a dangerous public health threat, and New York State continues to pursue every possible measure to combat it,” Governor Cuomo said. “By enlisting the cooperation of state agencies and New Yorkers, we are taking aggressive action to help reduce the prevalence of mosquito breeding grounds across the state and stop this disease at its source. As the Zika situation continues to evolve, we will remain vigilant and strengthen our prevention efforts to safeguard the public health and safety of all New Yorkers.”

As mosquitoes lay eggs in or near water, and their offspring “grow up” in water before emerging as adults that fly and bite, stagnant water serves as potential breeding ground for mosquitoes capable of transmitting the Zika virus.

As part of this initiative, the state Department of Health, in partnership with the MTA, will target 36 priority locations to eliminate sources of standing water. The primary focus will be to increase drainage within the stations, while also deploying larvicide tablets as needed. Working with the MTA, the Department of Health will also place new traps to monitor the mosquito population and ensure rigorous testing and reporting of the presence of the albopictus mosquito across the system. Additionally, the State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation will continue to coordinate with both the Department of Health and Department of Environmental Conservation to aggressively identify and eliminate potential mosquito breeding grounds in parks and recreational areas across the state.

August 13, 2016

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.